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Monday, October 26, 2015

Jihadists make U.N. camps hellish nightmare for Christians

Jihadists make U.N. camps hellish nightmare for Christians

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The Syrian civil war has caused 3.5 million refugees, with more than 350,000 being targeted by the United Nations for resettlement outside the region.
The Syrian civil war has caused 3.5 million refugees, with more than 350,000 being targeted by the United Nations for resettlement outside the region.
The United Nations refugee camps that will be sending 85,000 “displaced persons” to the United States over the next year for permanent resettlement are infested with jihadists who target and kill Christian refugees, according to a U.N. aid worker who spoke to a British newspaper.
The jihadists are sending teams of trained killers into U.N. camps disguised as refugees to kidnap and kill vulnerable Christians, the Sunday Express reported.
But refugees are terrified to report many of the killings in case they are targeted next, according to an aid worker who spoke to the Express on the condition that his name not be used for fear of reprisals.
The emergence of Islamic hit squads targeting Christians came to light after one terrorist had second thoughts and renounced jihad after witnessing Christians helping out other refugees within the camp, the Express reported.
He then revealed that he had been sent with an Islamist assassin team from ISIS to eliminate Christians as part of the terrorist group’s ideological obsession with emptying the Middle East of all Christians.
The aid worker, who works at a U.N. camp in Jordan, told the Express that the jihadists are also kidnapping young refugee girls to sell as sex slaves.
He said: “The Muslim gangs come as refugees, but they have their agendas.”
The aid worker told the Christian Post: “The last time I went inside a camp, I had a policeman with me.
“The camps are dangerous because they have IS, Iraqi militias and Syrian militias. It’s another place for gangs.
“They’re killing inside the camps, and they’re buying and selling ladies and even girls.”
WND previously reported in July and again in September, that while Christians are the most vulnerable of all people in the Middle East, not many have been going to the U.N. refugee camps because word is spreading about the dangerous conditions that await them there – mistreatment and even death at the hands of Muslims placed in positions of authority by the U.N.
This explains why Muslims make up 97 percent of the Syrian “refugees” being sent to the U.S. and Europe from U.N. refugee camps. Not only is there a bias against Christian refugees by the U.S., Britain and other Western governments, but there are very few Christians in the camps to start with.
Lord George Carey, who is Britain’s former Archbishop of Canterbury, described the situation last month in an op-ed for the Telegraph. Carey said accepting refugees from U.N. camps won’t help Syrian Christians who are being hunted like dogs by their Islamic oppressors, their property stolen, their men beheaded and their women raped.
While Carey said he welcomes his country’s announcement to take in 22,000 Syrian refugees, the most targeted refugees are being left behind to face their Islamic killers. The U.S. has committed thus far to taking at least 11,500 mostly Muslim Syrian refugees through 2016, and Canada’s new liberal government wants to accept 25,000. The U.S. also accepts 7,000 to 8,000 Muslim Somali refugees annually from a massive U.N. refugee camp in Kenya that the Kenyan president alleges has served as a launching pad for terrorist strikes against Christians in his country.
“But the frustration for those of us who have been calling for compassion for Syrian victims for many months is that the Christian community is yet again left at the bottom of the heap,” Carey wrote.
The ‘Arab Spring’ — which was celebrated by President Obama and other Western leaders — ultimately unleashed a wave of deadly persecution against Christians across North Africa and the Middle East. Secular dictators such as Egypt’s Mubarak, Syria’s Assad and Libya’s Qaddafi fell out of favor with the West, which supported the religious Muslim Brotherhood-supported dictators who were waiting in the wings.
“Christians in Syria and Iraq are generally caught in the middle of these conflicts and find they are targeted by all sides, because they support democratic reform and are perceived to be sympathetic to the West,” said George Marlin, chairman of Aid to the Church in Need USA and author of “Christian Persecutions in the Middle East: A 21st Century Tragedy.”
Destroying the ‘cradle of Christianity’
“Many elements on both sides would not be unhappy if Christians disappeared from the face of the Middle East and they (the Islamists) would destroy all the Christian historical sites, the relics and the documents dating back to the founding of the Church, that are there,” he told WND. “Peter centered the church in Antioch before he moved it up to Rome. Syria is the cradle of Christianity.”
He said Christians were generally left alone under Assad and lived peacefully. “But Islamic Turks slaughtered 200,000 Christians in Syria during the Ottoman Empire so it’s nothing new.”
As of December 2014, 600,000 Syrian Christians had fled their country or have been internally displaced, Marlin reports. In Aleppo, more than 65 percent have been forced to leave.
He told WND most Syrian Christians will not go to the U.N. refugee camps for two reasons. First, they are afraid they will be physically harmed and, second, they do not want to leave their country.
“The Christians are afraid to go to those camps, because the camps are basically populated by Muslims, and they’re afraid of retaliation and harm in these camps,” Marlin said. “So what is happening with the Christian refugees is the Christian community is basically taking care of these people, they’re staying in the churches, they’re staying in Christian homes, and we at Aid to the Church in Need are trying to get aid to the churches that are housing them.”
He said many rural Syrians have been run off their farms and have fled to the mountains between Syria and Lebanon, while others have gone into Lebanon. Many would rather die than abandon their ancient homeland, but there may soon come a day when they run out of places to flee.
“In Aleppo and elsewhere, Christians who are escaping, they are staying at Christian homes, churches, places where there is solidarity so they are not necessarily leaving the country or trying to get into refugee camps,” he said.
Marlin said the persecution of the Church in Syria has followed the same pattern as every other country where Islamists have taken over.
“In the eight countries I cover in the book, the tactics are pretty much the same, with the exception of Saudi Arabia which doesn’t have any Christians and focuses on harassing Christians there as guest workers,” he said. “In the other seven countries, the churches are being blown up on high holy days; the pastors are being abducted and murdered. We’ve kept these records so people can recognize the pattern.”
‘Horrified’ by Obama response to persecution
He said the response of the Obama administration to the war on Christianity in the Middle East has been abysmal.
“My hope in writing this book was to remind the West that the unthinkable is real and to jolt the conscience of the West, where too many people have been putting their heads in the sand, including the White House,” Marlin said. “I was horrified at the response of the White House when those Coptic Christians were murdered on the beach in Libya, specifically because they were Christians, and our president referred to them as ‘migrant workers from Egypt.’
Marlin believes part of the lack of response comes from the fact that Europe, and increasingly America, has lost touch with its Christian roots and thus feel no connection with the persecuted Christians of the Middle East.
It has been said that “the last acceptable prejudice is against Christianity,” Marlin said. “And when people like Mrs. Clinton said that we must change our religious views (on same-sex marriage), that is where we’re heading.  You can practice your religion in your home and within your church, but not in the public square. So yes, language matters, culture matters, and we’re seeing a change in the language to justify actively shutting up of Christians in the public square.”